Snapshot: Alex Peavey and Mindfulness Beyond Collegiate

AP&JKZ

Peavey with Jon Kabat-Zinn. Photo courtesy of Alex Peavey.

While walking around the Collegiate campus, I came across none other than Upper School Counselor and Coach Alex Peavey. As many of you know, he also oversees the JK-12 Mindfulness Program at Collegiate. He teaches all of the freshmen and a Senior Seminar class on the topic of mindfulness. However, outside of Collegiate he is also very involved with mindfulness. In our conversation, he told me about how he worked with a Division I lacrosse team over the weekend and put them through a two hour training. The training focused on peak performance and everyday mindfulness, and how one leads to another. Our discussion lead to other things he does outside of the Collegiate community.

Every other Monday, Peavey goes to the Cameron Gallagher Foundation and offers mindfulness instruction to Richmond area high school students who typically aren’t offered it at their school. Two years ago, Peavey spoke to the Federal Reserve in Richmond and presented the topic of mindfulness in the workplace. The talk was streamed and broadcasted to other Federal Reserve locations around the country. For the last four years, Peavey has done mindfulness at the Bon Air Juvenile Correctional Center. Last year, he took his advisory there and did a practice with both his advisory and some of the members of the Correctional Center.

Peavey has also given talks at both University of Richmond and Virginia Commonwealth University, to both undergraduate students and graduate students. In October of 2015, Peavey gave the John Cook lecture at VCU, which is a annual event sponsored by the School of Education. Two years ago, Peavey gave a talk titled “Developing a Mindfulness Program for a School and the Surrounding Community” at the UMass Medical School’s Center for Mindfulness, at an annual conference sponsored by Jon Kabat-Zinn, a world-renowned mindfulness expert. During the talk, one of the top researchers in the field of mindfulness stated that, “Collegiate is the first of the next generation of mindful schools–up to this point all of these schools have been doing it for research purposes, Collegiate does it for the good of its students.” We are certainly lucky to have Peavey at Collegiate doing what he does for the community.

About the author

Jack is a senior, probably.